Better Digital Products using Domain Oriented APIs: The Shopping Mall Metaphor


APIs are the abstractions over technical services. Good APIs mirror strategic thinking in an organisation and lead to better customer experience by enabling high-degree of connectivity via secure mechanisms

Too much focus is on writing protocols & semantics with the desire to design good APIs and too little on business objectives. Not enough questions are asked early on and the focus is always on system-system integration. I believe thinking about what a business does and aligning services to leads us to product centric thinking with reuseable services

History
As an ardent student of software design and engineering principles, I have been keen on Domain Driven Design (DDD) and had the opportunity to apply these principles in the enterprise business context in building reusable and decoupled microservices. I believe the best way to share this experience is through a metaphor and I use a “Shopping mall” metaphor with “Shops” to represent a large enterprise with multiple lines of businesses and teams

Like all metaphors – mine breaks beyond a point but it helps reason about domains, bounded contexts, APIs, events and microservices. This post does not provide a dogmatic point-of-view or a “how to guide”; rather it aims to help you identify key considerations when designing solutions for an enterprise and is applicable upfront or during projects

I have been designing APIs and microservices in Health and Insurance domains across multiple lines of business, across varying contexts over the past 5-8 years. Through this period, I have seen architects (especially those without Integration domain knowledge) struggle to deliver strategic, product centric, business friendly APIs. The solutions handed to us always dealt with an “enterprise integration” context with little to no consideration for future “digital contexts” leading to brittle, coupled services and frustration from business teams around cost of doing integration ( reckon this is why IT transformation is hard )

This realisation led me to asking questions around some of our solution architecture practices and support them through better understanding and application of domain modeling and DDD (especially strategic DDD ). Thought this practice, I was able to design and deliver platforms for our client which were reusable and yet not coupled


Domain Queries 

In one implementation, my team delivered around 400 APIs and after 2 years the client has been able to make continuous changes & add new features without compromising the overall integrity of the connected systems or their data

Though my journey with DDD in the Enterprise, I discovered some fundamental rules about applying these software design principles in a broader enterprise context but first we had to step in to our customer’s shoes and ask some fundamental questions about their business and they way they function

The objective is to key aspects of the API ecosystem you are designing for, below are some of the questions you need to answer through your domain queries

  • What are your top-level resources leading to a product centric design?
  • When do you decide what they are? Way up front or in a project scrum?
  • What are the interactions between these domain services?
  • How is the quality and integrity of your data impacted through our design choices?
  • How do you measure all of this “Integration entropy” – the complexity introduced by our integration choices between systems?

The Shopping Mall example

Imagine being asked to implement the IT system for a large shopping complex or shopping mall. This complex has a lot of shops which want to use the system for showing product information, selling them, shipping them etc

There are functions that are common to all the shops but with nuanced difference in the information they capture – for example, the Coffee Shop does “Customer Management” function with their staff, while the big clothes retail store needs to sell its own rewards point and store the customer’s clothing preferences and the electronics retail does its customer management function through its own points system

You have to design the core domains for the mall’s IT system to provide services they can use (and reuse) for their shops and do so while being able to change aspects of a shop/business without impacting other businesses

Asking Domain and Context questions

  • What are your top-level “domains” so that your can build APIs to link the Point-of-Sale (POS), CRM, Shipping and other systems?
  • Where do you draw the line? Is a service shared by all businesses or to businesses of a certain type or not shared at all?
  • Bounded contexts? What contexts do you see as they businesses do their business?
  • APIs or Events? How do you share information across the networked systems to achieve optimal flow of information while providing the best customer experience? Do you in the networked systems pick consistency or availability?

Summary:

Though my journey with DDD in the Enterprise, I discovered some fundamental rules about applying these software design principles in a broader enterprise context. I found it useful to apply the Shopping Mall metaphor to a Business Enterprise when designing system integrations

It is important to understand the core business lines, capabilities (current and target state), business products, business teams, terminologies then do analysis on any polysemy across domains and within domain contexts leading to building domains, contexts and interactions

We then use this analysis to design our solution with APIs, events and microservices to maximise reuse and reduce crippling coupling

Published by

techiecook

I apply my degree in computing with my experience in building networked software to create products that people will love. More about me here https://techiecook.com/about/

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